when leftmeetsright

Packing time!

So about a week ago my boyfriend asked me to move in with him and I said Yes! So now comes the fun part, he wants me to feel at home (He is the sweetest!) so I wanted to buy a couple of art pieces to put around the place.. this is why my next few weeks of blogs will mainly consist of paintings.. maybe even some DIY ones :) Would really appreciate any suggestions!

oakcat:

by Brent Pearson

Equipment 
The good news is that you don’t need a lot of expensive equipment to do night photography. Here’s what you need.
• Your camera needs to have a bulb setting (which allows you to lock the shutter open) and manual control over your lens’s aperture.• You need a reasonably sturdy tripod• You need a cable release that allows you to lock the shutter open• A bright torch to help you compose and focus.
Step 1: Compose and focus
Find a good composition and set up your camera securely on the tripod. To help you see, you want to use a bright torch that is illuminating your subject. ideally get an assistant to help you out with the torch, otherwise I grip the torch between my knees (which frees up my hands to work the camera controls).Zoom in all the way on the point of focus and either manually focus or use your autofocus. Once your lens is focused, you will need to put your lens into “manual mode” so that it does not try to autofocus again.
Step 2: Estimating exposure
In my eBook I explain a more accurate way of calculating exposure, but for this quick guide let me just give you a simple exposure table to get you started. Make sure that you set your camera’s ISO to 200. To estimate exposure, you start off by looking down the column to the moon setting that matches your current conditions. So if you were shooting under a half moon, then you would go down to the third row. Then you can read across that row to explore different exposure settings. 
 So you could expose your image for 2min @ f4 or equally 4min @ f5.6 or 8min @ f8.
I would recommend you use the widest aperture you have for your initial test shot to ensure that your exposure is correct.
When evaluating your exposure, I strongly recommend you use your camera’s histogram rather than just viewing the image on the LCD. At night the LCD looks bright, and it is easy to think an image is correctly exposed only to find when you get back to your computer that it is 2 stops under exposed. If you need more information on reading histograms, check out this article.
I would recommend you do your first night photography experiments under a full moon, as this will require the shortest exposures and allow you to correct any mistakes relatively quickly.
Getting the exposure right in camera is critical. If you find that you need to boost your exposure later on the computer, you will probably find that you magnify a lot of noise that is produced in your images. Long exposure photography does introduce more noise to your images, but providing your exposure is correct, this noise is manageable. Any amplification of your exposure or signal during post production will amplify the noise to the point where it becomes a major problems.
Once you start becoming comfortable with the world of night photography, then you are ready to start experimenting with light painting. I’ll write a separate article on light painting in a future post. If you are hungry to learn more about the world of night photography and light painting, then check out my web site for lots of tips and tutorials as well as my eBook on Night Photography and Light Painting.

oakcat:

by Brent Pearson

Equipment
 

The good news is that you don’t need a lot of expensive equipment to do night photography. Here’s what you need.

• Your camera needs to have a bulb setting (which allows you to lock the shutter open) and manual control over your lens’s aperture.
• You need a reasonably sturdy tripod
• You need a cable release that allows you to lock the shutter open
• A bright torch to help you compose and focus.

Step 1: Compose and focus


Find a good composition and set up your camera securely on the tripod. To help you see, you want to use a bright torch that is illuminating your subject. ideally get an assistant to help you out with the torch, otherwise I grip the torch between my knees (which frees up my hands to work the camera controls).
Zoom in all the way on the point of focus and either manually focus or use your autofocus. Once your lens is focused, you will need to put your lens into “manual mode” so that it does not try to autofocus again.

Step 2: Estimating exposure


In my eBook I explain a more accurate way of calculating exposure, but for this quick guide let me just give you a simple exposure table to get you started. Make sure that you set your camera’s ISO to 200. To estimate exposure, you start off by looking down the column to the moon setting that matches your current conditions. So if you were shooting under a half moon, then you would go down to the third row. Then you can read across that row to explore different exposure settings. 


 
So you could expose your image for 2min @ f4 or equally 4min @ f5.6 or 8min @ f8.

I would recommend you use the widest aperture you have for your initial test shot to ensure that your exposure is correct.

When evaluating your exposure, I strongly recommend you use your camera’s histogram rather than just viewing the image on the LCD. At night the LCD looks bright, and it is easy to think an image is correctly exposed only to find when you get back to your computer that it is 2 stops under exposed. If you need more information on reading histograms, check out this article.

I would recommend you do your first night photography experiments under a full moon, as this will require the shortest exposures and allow you to correct any mistakes relatively quickly.

Getting the exposure right in camera is critical. If you find that you need to boost your exposure later on the computer, you will probably find that you magnify a lot of noise that is produced in your images. Long exposure photography does introduce more noise to your images, but providing your exposure is correct, this noise is manageable. Any amplification of your exposure or signal during post production will amplify the noise to the point where it becomes a major problems.

Once you start becoming comfortable with the world of night photography, then you are ready to start experimenting with light painting. I’ll write a separate article on light painting in a future post. If you are hungry to learn more about the world of night photography and light painting, then check out my web site for lots of tips and tutorials as well as my eBook on Night Photography and Light Painting.

ryanpanos:

quote vendor by alice wang

taiwanese designer alice wang has conceived the ‘quote vendor’ – a vending machine that distributes passages of writing in a clear plastic bottle. the concept is informed by contemporary society’s hunger for ‘fast-food’ style information – from facebook to twitter and text messaging – people are becoming more and more accustomed to short, digestible pieces of information. the experience similar to the anticipation upon opening a fortune cookie, a sheet of pa­per with the text, as well as the title of the book and author’s name is rolled up and placed into a vessel – each quote filed under different categories a user can choose from. wang hopes this will entice people to learn more from whatever writing they have been given, and maybe finish that 300 page novel they have been meaning to.